Dismantling the Bus: Days 1,2,3

It’s been a busy week at our Lucaston Block.

On Monday, feeling a little disheartened by our attempts at building a kennel over the weekend, we decided to tackle work proper and begin dismantle the bus. As we were still sleeping in the bus this meant packing everything away and moving it all out: furniture, bags, couch, table; the lot.

The bus before dismantling begun.

The bus before dismantling begun.

Thankfully the bags and the cupboards didn’t take too long and by mid morning we were able to tackle the more difficult furniture such as the couch. The couch itself was the problem- the glue that was holding it together had started to wear- it was more it’s location.

Right next to the door it was protected by a metal railing. For the couch to be removed the railing had to be removed. And this was proving more difficult then we thought. Riveted into the door we had to drill out each of the rivets. Some were easy. Others a struggle- snapping the rivet drill piece a number of times. Eventually with some drilling and brut force we were able to remove the door railing and thus the couch.

Deirdre hard at work beginning to remove some of the railing.

Deirdre hard at work beginning to remove some of the railing.

The railing finally being removed.

The railing finally being removed.

After lunch we set to removing the overhead railings and drivers side storage. The railings were fairly easy. Held on by screws we were able to get all of the drivers railing down and if not for four stubborn screws we would have had the drivers side railing down.

Taking down the overhead rail.

Taking down the overhead rail.

Deirdre taking down the overhead storage.

Deirdre taking down the drivers side railing.

The overhead storage was a little trickier with it being held on by a combination of brackets, screws and rivets. We made as much progress as we could by screwing and drilling out the rivets (with not too much success it might be added) and called it a night.

Tuesday began where we left off. Finish dismantling the furniture and the overhead storage. If we worked hard enough we might even be able to take out the carpet.

We started with the bed base. Lift up the top and wiggling out the mdf boards so we could tackle the bed frame. As we were beginning to discover the previous tenants loved their big screws and so with a lot of elbow grease we unscrewed and unscrewed until we had the frame out.

Deirdre (and Oscar) working on removing the last screws in the bed base.

Deirdre (and Oscar) working on removing the last screws in the bed base.

In the process of which we found a water tank and a big hole in the floor. Assuming the floor to be made of metal we feared that it was a big rust hole. Distracted I banged my head on the metal railing we’d failed to take down yesterday.

Pissed off and fearing the worst as I rested from the gash to the head I decided to take a look under the bus to see just what we were in for. To my pleasant (and Deirdre’s) surprise the whole bus floor was plywood over a metal frame. The rusty hole was not rust but the waterlogged plywood flaking away. I may have been bleeding but we’d had a victory of sorts.

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The rust hole which wasn’t!

We then set to rolling up the carpet before continuing on with removing the overhead storage area. Having limited success with the rivet drill piece the day before we decided this time we would bring out the big guns. And so with the generator surging along Deirdre became acquainted with her new favourite tool: the angle grinder.

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Deirdre and her new favourite tool!

And what a difference it had made. Whereas the previous day we struggled today we were flying along and able to pull out most of the overhead storage. Cocky I made a bet with Deirdre that by Friday we would have the whole skin of the back out. The winner would shout the other a cider.

The bus end of day two. Well on truly on the way to winning a bet!

The bus end of day two. Well on truly on the way to winning a bet!

Distracted at the end of the day I again hit my head against the passenger side pole. For all the work we had done the bus was taking it’s vegenance out on me

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Wounded but not defeated. To new gashes adorning the head.

Wednesday began early. Grace Removals were delivering our stuff at 8 so we had to tidy a space for them.

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Our daily to do list: mid morning Wednesday!

Barely had the truck driven down the road and I was already rummaging through our stuff. I had a date with the overhanging pole and a little trick up my sleeve: an old fashioned hacksaw! In hand 5 minutes later I was posing out the door with pole in arm.

Bus 2: Scott 1.

Bus 2: Scott 1.

After that we set about clearing a spot for Brutus so we could set up the dining area under the carport. A quick and easy job that meant by mid-morning we were back in the bus ready to start taking down the roof.

Beginning to take down the roof.

Beginning to take down the roof.

Held on again by screws we were able this time to use a screwdriver and slowly but surely unscrew the roof bit by bit. Taking down each piece as we went. Eager to get it done I attempted to take down one of the roof boards myself. As the photos below show it wasn’t the safest approach to take.

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Roof completed we then set about taking out the drivers side panelling. With a little bit brut force using the hammer and my trusty red screwdriver we were able to wedge in between the rusty screws and leverage them off. The plywood was then fairly easy to remove and pretty quickly we had the side panelling off.

Unscrewing the wall panelling.

Unscrewing the wall panelling.

Which was relief as it little did we know it was a 35 degree day hence the bus feeling like a sauna. We then settled down for a cold beer and to relax. Pleased with our achievements in 3 days.

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Last of the drivers side panelling being removed.

 

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Dismantling the Bus: Days 1,2,3

  1. Hey guys, I just read all your blog posts (the ones about your move at least). I am in the dreaming phase of my getting off grid journey and have been contemplating the idea of having a bus on a bit of land. I really love what you guys are doing especially the fact that you have your dogs with you (we have a number of fur kids as well). Currently I live about 45 mins south of where you are in Garden Island Creek, its pretty isolated with lots of bush. We are only renting so there isn’t much room to develop the property the way we want.

    Anyways, as you guys are new to Tassie I wanted to offer any help that I could, whether you need some insider info on top spots in the valley or a hand putting up some dog fencing (I just finished our fencing, its a big job but important) and maybe in return you guys could give me a better perspective on living off grid and in a bus.

    Thanks again, looking forward to your next post.
    Chris.

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    • Hi Chris, Thanks for the comment. Glad you like the blog. The offer of helping out with the fence is greatly appreciated and one we will take up once we have the land cleared behind the bus. That’s pencilled in for mid Feb so I’d say late Feb/Early March and we will be ready for the fencing. I’ll send you the address so if you are passing through Lucaston you can swing by. thanks Scott

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      • Absolutely no worries, you’ve got my email now so let me know whenever you’re ready. In the meantime I’d love to check out your setup next time I’m up that way.

        Cheers,
        Chris.

        Like

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